Distressed thug cries for his mum as he’s jailed for violence during mass brawl

Burly Adam Foster, 28, pleaded with the judge at Hull Crown Court as he was sentenced

A thug jailed for a mass street brawl broke down in court as he was sentenced and wailed: “Mam! I can’t do it!”

Adam Foster then began struggling with custody officers after being jailed for violence at Hull Crown Court.

The 28-year-old pleaded with the judge, saying: “Please, I can’t do it.”

His three accomplices rushed to the other side of the dock to avoid him, Hull Live reports.

Foster began looking distressed after he was told he would be jailed for his part in violence outside city centre venue Diva’s bar, at 1.30am on October 7.

Foster’s barrister, Julia Baggs, went to speak with him after he raised his hand, then told Judge David Tremberg: “You honour can see he’s deeply anxious about the outcome of the hearing.”

The judge said: “Mr Foster, thank you. You can go down.”

He was reluctantly led away to begin his 51-week sentence after admitting affray and breaching a suspended sentence.

Trouble flared after a woman named as Eve Morris stole £100 from Foster’s co-defendant David Norris, 26, while they were in Diva’s.

CCTV footage then captured Foster, Norris, Michael Dear, 33, and Leeds horse trader James Price, 33 – who was wearing green wellies – clashing with a rival group outside the bar, and appearing to get the upper hand.

Although Norris, of Sweet Dews Grove, east Hull, avoided an immediate prison sentence after also admitting affray, the court heard his job was now at risk after Miss Baggs, who also represented him, revealed he worked “perhaps somewhat ironically, assisting with the rehabilitation of offenders in Grimsby”.

Prosecutor Stephen Welch described the “heavily built” Foster, of Novello Garth, west Hull, grabbing a man and pushing him to the ground.

The victim got up and ran to some shutters, where he was thrown to the ground and attacked by the group and kicked, with Foster stamping on him with “some force”.

Norris kicked a man at least three times, and stamped on another at least three times. Price, who had been urinating against a wall, kicked a man on the ground twice, and started kicking the man Foster had pushed to the ground.

Although a man in a red T-shirt appeared to bear the brunt of the attack, he declined to make a complaint.

Dear, of Bankside Park, west Hull, and Price, of Cotley Springs Caravan Park, Morley, also both admitted affray.

Mr Welch said Norris had been drinking gin since 2pm the previous day and could remember little of the incident. “He hadn’t a clue what had happened,” Mr Welch said. “When he woke up he had to think what he was doing in custody because he had no recollection of being arrested.”

Foster said he had gone to help his friend Norris, and told police: “I didn’t mean to stamp on him. It wasn’t intentional. I wouldn’t hurt someone while they were down.”

Price, who had been drinking lager and Jagerbombs, was “unable to remember anything from the previous night”. Price had also begun drinking at 2pm the previous day, having brought some horses to a horse fair.

Dear, who had been at Hull Fair and then been drinking in Hessle Road, was drinking vodka and “doesn’t normally drink much”.

Miss Baggs said of Foster: “He viewed the footage with his partner and his mother and was disgusted with his behaviour, as was his family.” She said Norris was “utterly dismayed” when he watched the footage.

She said Norris had confronted Eve Morris after she took the money and she “headbutted him, and some 20 minutes later, outside having a cigarette he was punched by one of her male friends”.

Timothy Jacobs, for Price, said an officer who viewed the footage described his involvement as “a couple of feeble boots” and said: “I would commend that description to the court.”

Price was the only breadwinner in his family, he said.

Harold Bloomfield, for Dear, said he cared for his children and father, and said there were “perhaps far more positive aspects to this man’s background that perhaps, in my submission, outweigh the necessity for any custodial sentence to be immediate”.

Norris, Price and Dear all received 26 weeks in prison, suspended for 12 months, and were each ordered to pay £250 costs.

Price was ordered to do 120 hours of unpaid work; Dear was ordered to do 90 hours and have up to ten days rehabilitation; while Norris was ordered to do 75 hours and have up to 20 days rehabilitation.

Judge Tremberg told the four: “The incident reflects very badly on each of you. It occurred outside licensed premises in the small hours of the morning in the centre of Hull. Each of you were heavily in drink.

“I sentence you on the basis that none of you went out that night looking for trouble, and that none of you were responsible for starting the ugly incident itself. Furthermore, I bear in mind the incident was comparatively short-lived.

“However, once the public disorder had begun each of you played a material and unlawful part in it; not simply by the use of threatening behaviour but also by the use of unlawful violence, and each of shares responsibility for the overall incident, which was, in my judgement, serious public disoder.”